How to become a freemason?

GLSI Mission

Our Mission is to make good men better, to practice and perpetuate a way of life that promotes the Brotherhood of Man and to assist Lodges to grow and prosper.

GLSI vision

Our Vision is to be a highly respected fraternity composed of men of integrity and character, who are honest, true to their word, have a belief in God, are devoted to family, charitable in their community, and courteous and helpful to each other.

What is freemasonry?

Freemasonry is a voluntary, fraternal organization, composed of men of good will, good character and good reputation, whom in most jurisdictions around the world, believe in an Almighty Creator and practice the spirit of universal brotherhood to man.
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How to become a freemason?

The Essential Qualification For Membership
The essential qualification for admission into and continuing membership is a belief in a Supreme Being. Membership is open to men of any race or religion who can fulfill this essential qualification and are of good repute.
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How to become a freemason

The Essential Qualification For Membership
The essential qualification for admission into and continuing membership is a belief in a Supreme Being. Membership is open to men of any race or religion who can fulfill this essential qualification and are of good repute.

The Three Great Principles
For many years Freemasons have followed three great principles: Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth.

Freemasonry and Religion

Basic Statement
Freemasonry is not a religion, nor is it a substitute for religion. It demands of its members a belief in a Supreme Being but provides no system of faith of its own.

Freemasonry is open to men of all religious faiths. The discussion of religion at its meetings is forbidden.

The Supreme Being
The names used for the Supreme Being enable men of different faiths to join in prayer (to God as each sees Him) without the terms of prayer causing dissension among them.

There is no separate Masonic God; a Freemason’s God remains the God of the religion he professes.

Freemasons meet in common respect for the Supreme Being, as he remains Supreme in their individual religions, and it is no part of Freemasonry to attempt to join religions together. There is therefore no composite Masonic God.

Volume of the Sacred Law
The Bhagavad Gita, The Bible, The Quran, The Granth and The Zend Avesta referred to by Freemasons as the Volume of the Sacred Law, are always open at every Masonic meeting.

The obligations of Freemasonry
The obligations taken by Freemasons are sworn on or involve the Volumes of the Sacred Law or the books held sacred by those concerned. They undertake to help keep secret, a Freemason’s means of recognition, and to follow principles of Freemasonry. The physical penalties which are purely symbolic do not form part of an Obligation. The commitment to follow the principles of Freemasonry is, however deep.

Freemasonry compared with Religion

Freemasonry lacks the basic elements of religion:

  • It has no theological doctrine, and by forbidding religious discussion at its meetings, it will not allow a Masonic theological doctrine to develop.
  • It offers no sacraments.
  • It does not claim to lead to salvation by works, by secret knowledge or by any other means. The secrets of Freemasonry are concerned with modes of recognition and not with salvation.

Freemasonry supports Religion

Freemasonry is far from indifferent to religion. Without interfering in religious practice it expects each member to follow his own faith, and to place above all other duties his duty to God by whatever name He is known. Its moral teachings are acceptable to all religions.

Freemasonry is thus a supporter of religion.

Freemasonry and Charity
From its earliest days, Freemasonry has been concerned with the care of orphans, the sick and the aged. This work continues today. In addition, large sums are given to national and local charity.

Freemasonry and Politics
Freemasonry is non-political, and the discussion of politics at Masonic meetings is forbidden.

Freemasonry and Society
This is intended to expand on the topic “What is Freemasonry”. It explains the Grand Lodge of South India’s views on Freemasonry and Society.

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